LATVIA

Get in contact or get a price estimation from our partner in Latvia Get in contact
Due to the COVID-19 pandemic, certain merger control processes may be affected. We suggest to contact our local partners for more information.
Content last updated: 14-01-2021

Choose the type of information you seek

  • Merger Control Regime
  • Merger Screening
  • Merger Filing

1. Supranationality

1.1 Membership of Supranational Organization

1.1.1 Is the jurisdiction a member of/party to a supranational jurisdiction?

Yes, Latvia is a member of the EU which is a supranational jurisdiction for the Member States, i.e. 27 EU member states.

1.1.2 Is the jurisdiction itself a supranational jurisdiction?

No.

1.1.3 If the answer to Section 1.1.1 and/or 1.1.2 above is in the affirmative, what are the implications hereof?

If the transaction meets both national and EU thresholds then the transaction may only be notified to the European Commission. 

2. Nature of merger control regime

2.1 Mandatory or voluntary

2.1.1 Is filing mandatory or voluntary?

Filing is mandatory if the first set of thresholds described in Section 2.3.1 under the Merger Screening Schedule are met.

Filing is voluntary if the second set of thresholds described under Section 2.3.1 under the Merger Screening Schedule are met.

Filing is also mandatory if the second set of thresholds described in Section 2.3.1 under the Merger Screening Schedule are met and the Competition Council requires submission of a filling within 12 months after the implementation of the transaction.

The undertakings concerned may, upon their own discretion, require the Competition Council to issue certification that the transaction in question does not meet the thresholds.

2.2 Suspensory effect

2.2.1 Must completion of the transaction await clearance by the relevant authorities?

Companies can start implementing a transaction in Latvia after the notification of the transaction, but before receiving the permission of the Competition Council, taking responsibility for the implementation before receipt of the permission in case of an unfavorable decision.

Transactions must be notified to the Competition Council prior to implementation/completion and following the conclusion of the agreement, the announcement of a public bid, or the acquisition of controlling interest.

1. What type of transactions are caught by the merger control regime?

1.1 Concentrations

1.1.1 Type of transactions that are caught by the merger control rules?

A transaction is caught by the merger control rules if it brings a change of control on a lasting basis resulting from:

a) merger of two or more previously independent undertakings in order to become one undertaking by creation of a new entity (consolidation); or

b) merger by absorption of one undertaking into another undertaking; or

c) acquisition, by one or more natural persons already controlling at least one undertaking, or by one or more undertakings, of a part or all of the fixed assets of one or several other undertakings or the right to use such assets. Acquisition of assets or of the right to use such assets is considered to be a merger if the acquisition of the assets or of the right to use such assets increases the market share of the acquirer of the aforementioned assets or the usage rights in any relevant market; or

d) acquisition, by one or more natural persons already controlling at least one undertaking, or by one or more undertakings, of direct or indirect decisive influence over another undertaking or other undertakings; or

e) simultaneous acquisition by a single natural person or two or several natural persons jointly of a part or all of the assets of two or several undertakings or obtaining of the right to use such assets, or a direct or indirect decisive influence over two or several undertakings.

1.2 Joint ventures

1.2.1 What types of joint ventures are caught by the merger control rules?

The creation of joint ventures performing on a lasting basis all the functions of an autonomous economic entity resulting in permanent structural market change, i.e. a so-called "full function" joint venture.

1.3 Definition of "control"

1.3.1 How are the concepts of "control" and "change of control" defined?

National regulatory enactments do not define “control”, instead the term “decisive influence” is used, which is the capability, directly or indirectly, to:

a) control (regularly or irregularly) the taking of decisions in an undertaking’s management bodies, with or without active participation thereof, or

b) appoint such number of members in the undertaking’s supervisory or executive body, which ensures for the wielder of the decisive influence a majority of votes in the respective body.

It has to be decided on the facts in each case, whether there is a possibility of exercising decisive influence over a market participant. Decisive influence can be de jure in the form of acquisition of the majority of the voting rights or through special rights; or de facto based on a historic pattern of attendance at annual general meetings.

National regulatory enactments do not define “change of control”.

1.4 Minority shareholdings

1.4.1 Are minority and other interests less than control caught by the merger control rules?

Yes, if they lead to an acquisition of control.

2. Establishing jurisdiction for notification of mergers

2.1 Merging parties/undertakings concerned

2.1.1 Which undertakings are considered parties to the merger ("undertakings concerned") in the various types of transactions identified under Section 1.1.1 and 1.2.1.

In the transaction specified under Section 1.1.1 a) above, the "undertakings concerned" are each of the merging undertakings.

In the transaction specified under Section 1.1.1 b) above, the "undertakings concerned" are the acquirer and the target.

In the transactions specified under Section 1.1.1 c) - e), the "undertakings concerned" are the acquirer (including natural persons) and the target assets or undertaking(s) (i.e. not including the seller).

2.2 Date for establishing jurisdiction

2.2.1 Which date is relevant for concluding whether the transaction is notifiable?

There is no specific point in time, from which to assess whether a transaction should be notified. A transaction, which is subject to mandatory notification, shall be notified before its implementation. For more information, see Section 2.2.1 under the Merger Control Regime Schedule.

2.3 General thresholds

2.3.1 Threshold(s) for when a concentration must be notified under the general merger control regime?

Merger Control filing is required when:

  • The combined turnover of all the undertakings concerned exceeded EUR 30,000,000 in Latvia in the last financial year, and the turnover of each of at least two of the undertakings concerned exceeded EUR 1,500,000 in Latvia in the last financial year.

The competition Council may review a transaction on its own initiative and require filing within 12 months of implementation of the transaction if:

  • at least two of the undertakings concerned operate in the same market with a combined market share of at least 40%; and
  • there is a cause for suspicion that the merger might result in, or strengthen, a dominant position or that competition in the relevant market might be significantly reduced.

In order to pre-empt post-merger control, the parties may opt to voluntarily file the transaction.

Certain undertakings important for national security operating in the following sectors may be required to obtain additional clearance by the government:  electronic communications, TV and radio, natural gas, electrical energy and heat energy.

2.3.2 For each threshold, can the threshold be triggered by only one undertaking having local turnover?

No, the thresholds cannot be triggered by only one party to the transaction.

2.3.3 For each threshold, can the threshold be triggered without any undertaking having local turnover?

No, the thresholds cannot be triggered without both parties having turnover in Latvia.

2.3.4 Are there any circumstances where transactions falling below these thresholds may be still investigated?

No.

2.4 Other national thresholds for ex ante merger control (e.g. sector-specific rules)

2.4.1 Relevant thresholds for sector-specific or other ex ante merger control rules?

There are no sector-specific merger control rules.

2.4.2 Are any such schemes mandatory or voluntary?

Not applicable.

2.5 Foreign-to-foreign mergers

2.5.1 Do any exemptions, special thresholds etc. apply to foreign-to-foreign mergers, i.e. where none of the undertakings concerned is domiciled in the jurisdiction?

Transactions meeting the above thresholds have to be notified to the Competition Council, regardless of whether the undertakings concerned are domiciled outside of Latvia.

3. Calculation and allocation of turnover, asset value, transaction value etc.

3.1 Relevant turnover

3.1.1 How is turnover defined (e.g. is income from other sources than "ordinary activities to be included, and how are rebates, taxes, internal turnover etc. treated)?

The relevant turnover to be taken into account is the net turnover in Latvia related to the sale of goods and/or services in the ordinary course of business exclusive of (i) rebates; (ii) value added tax and other taxes directly related to the turnover; and (iii) group internal sales.

3.1.2 Identification and link to any official rules, guidance etc. on how to calculate turnover?

Guidance to the calculation of turnover can be found in Cabinet Regulation No. 800 of 29 September 2008 “Procedures for the Submission and Examination of a Full-form and Short-form Notification Regarding a Merger of Market Participants”

(available here: https://likumi.lv/ta/en/en/id/181924-procedures-for-the-submission-and-examination-of-a-full-form-and-short-form-notification-regarding-a-merger-of-market-participants)

and the Competition Council Guidelines on Drafting Notice on Merger of Market Participants (available here: https://www.kp.gov.lv/oldfiles/38/citi%2F2016_zinojumu_par_tirgus_dalibnieku_apvienosanos_s.pdf).

3.2 Relevant period for calculation of turnover

3.2.1 Which financial year(s) is relevant for the calculation of turnover?

The turnover should be based on the latest financial year for which audited annual accounts exist. 

3.2.2 Should adjustments be made for e.g. divestitures, acquisitions, closings and other changes of the economic reality of the undertaking concerned made after or during the relevant financial year?

Adjustments must be made for any divestitures/acquisitions made during/after the latest financial year. Turnover stemming from such divested/acquired assets should be excluded/included.

3.3 Relevant undertakings for the calculation of turnover

3.3.1 The undertakings whose turnover is taken into account?

See the definition of the "undertakings concerned" in Section 2.1.1 above. In short, the undertakings whose turnover is taken into account include the entire group that the acquirer belongs to and the target's group (i.e. target and any of its wholly or jointly-owned subsidiaries).

3.3.2 Shall the turnover of the existing seller be included in the target's group turnover?

The seller's turnover is not included in the target's group turnover. 

3.4 Geographical allocation of turnover

3.4.1 The principles for the geographical allocation of turnover?

In general, the turnover should be allocated geographically based on where the customer was located at the time of the turnover generating transaction, i.e. typically where the goods were actually delivered or services actually provided.

3.5 Valuation and allocation of assets

3.5.1 The principles for valuation and allocation of assets?

Not applicable.

3.6 Calculation of other thresholds

3.6.1 The principles for calculation of metrics for other thresholds (e.g. transaction value, market share, share of supply etc.)?

Not applicable.

3.7 Special rules

3.7.1 Do any special rules or principles apply to the calculation, allocation etc. of turnover, assets etc. for specific undertakings (e.g. State-owned undertakings, investment funds, credit and financial institutions, insurance companies, financial holding companies, others)?

National regulatory enactments prescribe special rules applicable to the calculation, allocation etc. of turnover to credit institutions and insurance companies.

The net turnover of credit institutions shall be calculated, taking into account the sum of the referred to income: (i) income from interest; (ii) income from securities; (iii) commission remuneration received; (iv) net profit acquired from financial operations; (v) income from other operations. Income included in the annual reports and consolidated annual reports of credit institutions shall be included in the turnover of credit institutions.

The turnover of insurance companies shall be calculated, taking into account the gross value of signed premiums, which includes all sums received and to be received for insurance contracts (also reinsurance premiums) entered into by an insurance company or entered into on behalf thereof, deducting the tax payments and fees or mandatory payments, which are imposed on an insurance premium or the total amount of premiums.

3.7.2 Does any exemptions apply?

Not applicable.

3.8 Currency conversion

3.8.1 The exchange rate applied and applicable exchange rate date for conversion of the value of turnover and assets of undertakings in other jurisdictions?

Net turnover values not denominated in EUR, are converted EUR using the exchange rates published on the website of the European Central Bank available at the time of submission of the notice. The company's annual turnover must be converted at the average rate for the relevant 12 months.

1. Practical information

1.1 Responsibility for filing

1.1.1 The parties responsible for filing?

In case of acquisition of sole control, the acquirer is responsible for filing.

In case of acquisition of joint control or a merger creating a new entity, the notification must be jointly submitted.

1.2 Deadlines for filing

1.2.1 Are there any mandatory deadlines for filing, and, if so, how these are calculated?

There are no mandatory deadlines for filing.

However, a transaction subject to mandatory filing has to be notified to the Competition Council prior to its implementation.

1.2.2 Are there any sanctions for not filing within the deadlines?

Not applicable.

1.2.3 What are the sanctions for not filing a notifiable transaction?

If a notifiable transaction is not filled, the competition authority may impose a fine on the new market participant or on the acquirer of a decisive influence of up to 3% of their net turnover in the last financial year. The fine does not release the undertakings from the obligation to file a merger notice.

In addition, the competition authority may impose a pecuniary penalty on the new market participant or on the acquirer of a decisive influence in the amount of EUR 10,000 every 7 days after the competition authority has issued an administrative act imposing a duty to file merger notice.

1.3 Early filing

1.3.1 Is it possible to file before the signing of merger agreement?

A notification may also be submitted where the notifying parties to the transaction demonstrate a good faith intention to conclude an agreement (i.e. have signed a letter of intent or preliminary agreement) or, in the case of a public bid, where they have publicly announced an intention to make a bid, provided that the intended agreement or bid would result in a notifiable transaction to the Competition Council or the European Commission.

1.4 Filing fees

1.4.1 Are there any fees for filing, and, if so, please describe how such fees are calculated?

The filing fee is:

  • EUR 2,000 for a Short-form Notification;
  • EUR 2,000 if at the request of the Competition Council or at the initiative of the merging parties a merger notification has been submitted which does not reach the applicable turnover thresholds;
  • EUR 4,000 if the total turnover of the merging parties in the preceding reporting (financial) year in Latvia is EUR 30,000,000 or more but less than EUR 80,000,000;
  • EUR 8,000 if the total turnover of the merging parties in the preceding reporting (financial) year in Latvia is EUR 80,000,000 or more.

1.4.2 When must the filing fee must be paid?

The fee shall be paid to the state budget before the submission of the merger notification or, if the transaction has been assessed without the submitted merger notification, within 10 days after the receipt of the decision of the Competition Council.

1.5 Publicity

1.5.1 When and in which format will the authority publish receiving a notification?

The Competition Council publishes information regarding receipt of the notification on the website thereof (http://www.kp.gov.lv) and indicates the participants to the agreement and the date of receipt of the notification.

1.5.2 How will the authority in general handle the case publicly, e.g. will it usually comment in the media, send out press releases etc.?

The Competition Council usually publishes press releases on its website (http://www.kp.gov.lv). The text of the press release may be prepared by the submitter of the merger filing. The Competition Council may answer media questions in case they arise.

1.5.3 Will third parties be able to review the notification?

In order to ensure hearing of the opinions of market participants regarding the transaction’s impact on competition, the Competition Council may publish an invitation for the market participants to provide a justified opinion regarding the impact of the merger on competition on the website http://www.kp.gov.lv after commencement of additional examination of the notification.

The market participants, the type of agreement, the economic sectors affected by the agreement, the deadline for the submission of an opinion and type thereof must be indicated in the invitation. The Competition Council may ignore an opinion that is received without respect to the deadline indicated in the invitation.

2. Procedure and timing

2.1 Normal and simplified procedures

2.1.1. Does the regime allow for a simplified (fast track) procedure, and, if so, what are the criteria for using the simplified procedure?

Yes. A short-form filing may be submitted, if:

1) none of the undertakings concerned operate in a single relevant market or in a market that is vertically related thereto;

2) the undertakings concerned operate in a single relevant market and their aggregate market share does not exceed 20%;

3) the undertakings concerned operate in vertically related markets and the market share of each individual participant in the relevant market does not exceed 30%;

4) the undertakings concerned obtain joint control over another undertaking which does not generate and does not intend to generate turnover from selling goods or providing services in Latvia;

5) an undertaking obtains sole control over an undertaking in which it already has joint control.

2.2 Procedural stages (cf. timetable below)

2.2.1 The various stages of (i) a simplified procedure and (ii) a normal procedure?

In general, all merger procedures before the Competition Council (both simplified and normal) are initiated by a pre-notification period.

The pre-notification period may involve discussions with the Competition Council about the preparation of the notification, telephone and/or physical meetings, submission of draft notification, consultation on all matters concerning the regulation of mergers, as well as recommendations on the consultation process and its direction.

When the formal notification is submitted to the Competition Council and accepted as complete, the clock starts running on the case team's "Phase I" investigation.

If the Competition Council decides that such merger, of which a short-form filing has been submitted, requires additional investigation, it may require the undertakings concerned to submit a full-form filing.

Within 1 month of receipt of a formal notification, the Competition Council has to decide whether to clear the transaction in Phase I or open a "Phase II" investigation.

The Competition Council will also publish information about the case on its website inviting third parties to submit their observations and comments to the transaction within a specified period.

As part of the investigation, the case team may also send requests for information, including engaging in discussions and meetings with the notifying parties.

If the transaction cannot be cleared unconditionally in Phase I, the Competition Council will inform the notifying parties about the competition law concerns or initiate a Phase II investigation. In case the parties are informed about possible concerns before completion of Phase I, they will be entitled to propose remedies. If the notifying parties submit remedies, the Competition Council will assess the suitability of the proposed remedies.

The Competition Council will then either adopt a decision to permit (without or with remedies) or prohibit the merger (if the proposed remedies would not eliminate the competition law concerns), or initiate a Phase II investigation. 

During Phase II, the Competition Council will then normally continue its investigations and may contact third parties in the market, if they have not been previously contacted, and send further requests for information to the notifying parties and third parties.

If the transaction cannot be cleared unconditionally in Phase II, the Competition Council will inform the notifying parties about the competition law concerns. The notifying parties will be entitled to propose remedies. If the notifying parties submit remedies, the Competition Council will assess the suitability of the proposed remedies.

The notifying parties can then either submit remedies meeting the concerns in order to get a conditional clearing decision, withdraw the notification or receive a prohibit decision.

2.2.2 Is pre-notification contact with the relevant authorities customary/obligatory/encouraged/etc.?

The pre-notification contact to the Competition Council is voluntary and encouraged. The Competition Council provides the undertakings concerned with an opportunity to receive assistance in preparing the notification through consultations. A consultation covers all matters concerning the regulation of mergers.

As part of the consultation, the Competition Council provides explanations, references to the practice of the Latvian Competition Council and other countries, or other good practices that could be used in the preparation of the notification. The Competition Council recommends that the undertakings concerned inform the Competition Council about the progress of the transaction process until the submission of the notification to the Competition Council.

2.2.3 Are there any sanctions for not complying with the deadlines for each Phase or as set by the local authorities?

Not applicable.

2.3 Timetable (cf. timetable below)

2.3.1 The statutory timetable/deadlines for review of a notification?

Phase I:

Within 1 month from the receipt of a full-form merger filing or a short-form merger filing, the Competition Council has to decide whether to clear the transaction in Phase I or open a Phase II investigation.

If, within 45 days from the date of submission of a full-form or short-form merger filing, the notifying parties do not receive from the Competition Council a decision with respect to clearance of the transaction in Phase I or a decision to open a Phase II investigation, the relevant merger shall be deemed to be permitted.

Phase II:

The Competition Council may decide to open a Phase II investigation, within 1 month from the receipt of a full-form merger filing or a short-form merger filing.

If a Phase II investigation is necessary, the Competition Council shall take a decision regarding opening of a Phase II investigation and inform the notifying parties.

Within 4 months from the receipt of a full-form filing or within 3 months from receipt of a formal short-form filing, the Competition Council has to decide whether to clear the transaction in Phase II.

The Competition Council is entitled, upon the request of the notifying parties or upon its own initiative, to extend the term for taking the decision by 15 business days with a purpose to evaluate the commitments.

If, after opening of Phase II investigation, within 4 months from the date of receipt of the full-form merger filing, or within 3 months from the date of receipt of the short-form merger filing, the Competition Council has not taken any of decisions with respect to the merger, the relevant merger shall be deemed to be permitted.

2.3.2 Can the statutory timetable/deadlines be suspended ("stop-the-clock"), and if so under which conditions?

Not applicable.

2.3.3 If pre-notification with the relevant authorities contact is possible/customary, how long will the duration of such contact usually be?

There is no statutory timetable/deadline for the pre-notification period and the duration of such period may vary from a couple of weeks to more than a month, depending on namely the complexity of the specific transaction at hand.

3. Format and content of notification

3.1 Notification forms

3.1.1 Must the notifying parties use any mandatory notification forms, e.g. for simplified and normal procedures, and, if relevant, add a link to the relevant forms?

There are no mandatory forms for the notifications.

3.2 Supporting documentation

3.2.1 List of the supporting documentation which must as a minimum be submitted along with the notification?

Cf. checklist below.

3.3 Originals, legalization and apostillation (cf. checklist below)

3.3.1 List of all documents which must be submitted in original/legalized versions and whether any documents must be apostilled?

Documents issued by government or municipal institutions other than in the EU, EEA, Switzerland and the UK shall be legalized or apostilled.

3.3.2 If the merger regime has a mandatory filing deadline, must all the documents identified under Section 3.3.1 be submitted within this deadline?

Not applicable.

3.4 Language

3.4.1 Which languages may be used for drafting and filing a notification?

The notification shall be submitted in Latvian.

3.4.2 Does translations have to be certified/legalized and apostilled?

Not applicable.

Statutory timetable

Step Description Time
1

Please note that a simplified (fast track) procedure is possible. For more information refer to section 2.1.1 above.

Pre-notification

The pre-notification contact to the Competition Council is voluntary and encouraged. The Competition Council provides the undertakings concerned with an opportunity to receive assistance in preparing the notification through consultations. A consultation covers all matters concerning the regulation of mergers.

As part of the consultation, the Competition Council provides explanations, references to the practice of the Latvian Competition Council and other countries, or other good practices that could be used in the preparation of the notification. The Competition Council recommends that the undertakings concerned inform the Competition Council about the progress of the transaction process until the submission of the notification to the Competition Council.

There is no statutory timetable/deadline for the pre-notification period and the duration of such period may vary from a couple of weeks to more than a month, depending on namely the complexity of the specific transaction at hand.

2

Phase I

When the formal notification is submitted to the Competition Council and accepted as complete, the clock starts running on the case team's Phase I investigation.

If the Competition Council decides that such merger, of which a short-form filing has been submitted, requires additional investigation, it may require the undertakings concerned to submit a full-form filing.

Within 1 month of receipt of a formal notification, the Competition Council has to decide whether to clear the transaction in Phase I or open a "Phase II" investigation.

The Competition Council will also publish information about the case on its website inviting third parties to submit their observations and comments to the transaction within a specified period.

As part of the investigation, the case team may also send requests for information, including engaging in discussions and meetings with the notifying parties.

If the transaction cannot be cleared unconditionally in Phase I, the Competition Council will inform the notifying parties about the competition law concerns or initiate a Phase II investigation. In case the parties are informed about possible concerns before completion of Phase I, they will be entitled to propose remedies. If the notifying parties submit remedies, the Competition Council will assess the suitability of the proposed remedies.

The Competition Council will then either adopt a decision to permit (without or with remedies) or prohibit the merger (if the proposed remedies would not eliminate the competition law concerns) or initiate a Phase II investigation. 

Within 1 month from the receipt of a full-form merger filing or a short-form merger filing, the Competition Council has to decide whether to clear the transaction in Phase I or open a Phase II investigation.

If, within 45 days from the date of submission of a full-form or short-form merger filing, the notifying parties do not receive from the Competition Council a decision with respect to clearance of the transaction in Phase I or a decision to open a Phase II investigation, the relevant merger shall be deemed to be permitted.

3

Phase II

During Phase II, the Competition Council will then normally continue its investigations and may contact third parties in the market, if they have not been previously contacted, and send further requests for information to the notifying parties and third parties.

If the transaction cannot be cleared unconditionally in Phase II, the Competition Council will inform the notifying parties about the competition law concerns. The notifying parties will be entitled to propose remedies. If the notifying parties submit remedies, the Competition Council will assess the suitability of the proposed remedies.

The notifying parties can then either submit remedies meeting the concerns in order to get a conditional clearing decision, withdraw the notification or receive a prohibit decision.

The Competition Council may decide to open a Phase II investigation, within 1 month from the receipt of a full-form merger filing or a short-form merger filing.

If a Phase II investigation is necessary, the Competition Council shall take a decision regarding opening of a Phase II investigation and inform the notifying parties.

Within 4 months from the receipt of a full-form filing or within 3 months from receipt of a formal short-form filing, the Competition Council has to decide whether to clear the transaction in Phase II.

The Competition Council is entitled, upon the request of the notifying parties or upon its own initiative, to extend the term for taking the decision by 15 business days with a purpose to evaluate the commitments.

If, after opening of Phase II investigation, within 4 months from the date of receipt of the full-form merger filing, or within 3 months from the date of receipt of the short-form merger filing, the Competition Council has not taken any decisions with respect to the merger, the relevant merger shall be deemed to be permitted.

  • Step 1 1
  • Step 2 2
  • Step 3 3
  • Not defined
  • 1 month + 15 days
  • 4 months/3 months (for short-form filing) from Step 1

Checklist

List of the supporting documentation which must as a minimum be submitted along with the notification.

Supporting documentation

This content was delivered
and last updated on 14-01-2021 by
Contact Person
Andra Rubene, Partner, Head of M&A and Co-head of Competition Practice Group
CONTACT DETAILS:
Contact Person 2
Māra Stabulniece-Veldruma, Senior Associate, Co-head of Competition Practice Group

TGS Baltic has provided all input about merger control in Latvia.

TGS Baltic is a leading full-service commercial law firm in the Baltic States. With offices in Estonia, Latvia and Lithuania, the firm employs a total of 150+ lawyers, making it one of the largest law firms in the region.

Our top-tier Baltic competition law team advises clients on all matters related to competition law, including counselling companies on compliance of agreements, decisions or concerted practices or operations of dominant market players with competition rules, assisting on merger clearance for acquisitions and joint ventures, representing clients in competition authority proceedings and contesting their decisions in the administrative courts. We have also been involved in civil proceedings related to competition law damages claims. Additionally, the firm’s attorneys specialising in competition law hold a successful track record in the field of state aid.

For more information about TGS Baltic and merger control in Latvia, please contact our Partner directly.

Banner Logo     Banner Logo    Banner Logo    Banner Logo