SWITZERLAND

Get in contact or get a price estimation from our partner in Switzerland Get in contact
Content last updated: 29-08-2019

Choose the type of information you seek

  • Merger Control Regime
  • Merger Screening
  • Merger Filing

1. Overall description of merger control regime

1.1 Supranationality

1.1.1 Is the jurisdiction a member of/party to a supranational jurisdiction?

No.

1.1.2 Is the jurisdiction itself a supranational jurisdiction?

No.

1.1.3 If the answer to Section 1.1.1 and/or 1.1.2 above is in the affirmative, what are the implications hereof?

Not applicable.

2. Nature of merger control regime

2.1 Mandatory or voluntary

2.1.1 Is filing mandatory or voluntary?

Filing is mandatory, if the thresholds described in Section 2.3.1 under the Merger Screening Schedule below are met.

2.2 Suspensory effect

2.2.1  Must completion of the transaction await clearance by the relevant authorities?

Yes, if a transaction has to be notified, this has the effect that the undertakings concerned are prohibited from closing and implementing the transaction prior to clearance by the Swiss Competition Commission.

The undertakings concerned can request the Competition Commission to waive this standstill period. Such exemptions are possible in cases of important reasons, such as the reorganization of failing companies or pending public takeover bids.

1. What type of transactions are caught by the merger control regime?

1.1 Concentrations

1.1.1 Type of transactions that are caught by the merger control rules?

The following types of transactions are caught by the merger control rules: 

a) statutory mergers: a merger of two or more previously independent undertakings; or

b) the acquisition of control: any transaction by which one or more undertakings acquire direct or indirect control over one or more independent undertakings, or over a part thereof.

1.2 Joint ventures

1.2.1 What types of joint ventures are caught by the merger control rules?

Corporate joint ventures are subject to merger control if the joint venture performs all the functions of an autonomous economic entity on a lasting basis.

In past cases, the Competition Commission has, in particular, closely scrutinized whether or not the joint venture will be dependent on sales to the parent companies, and held that a joint venture which will supply goods and/or services only to the parent businesses, and which has no presence on the market or dealings with third parties, may not qualify as a full-function joint venture.

Newly-formed joint ventures are only subject to merger control if, in addition, some business activities of at least one of the controlling undertakings are included in the joint venture’s business. In practice, this criterion has generally been considered to be fulfilled in most cases.

1.3 Definition of "control"

1.3.1 How are the concepts of "control" and "change of control" defined?

"Control" is defined as the ability of an undertaking to exercise a decisive influence on the activity of the other undertaking (e.g. the production, the prices, the investments, the supply, the sales or the distribution of the profits or its general business policy) by the acquisition of rights over shares or by any other means. It is not important whether control is actually exercised nor whether control is vested directly or indirectly.

Joint control by more than one undertaking is, in particular, assumed if the controlling undertakings have a veto right for strategic decisions, such as decisions regarding the management of the company, its budget, its business plan, significant investments, market-specific rights etc.

Under certain conditions, a change in the quality of control may also be considered to be an acquisition of control (e.g. change from sole to joint control and vice versa, the increase of jointly controlling undertakings, or if one jointly controlling undertaking is replaced by another). Whether the reduction of the number of jointly controlling undertakings leads to a change in the quality of control needs to be assessed on a case by case basis.

1.4 Minority shareholdings

1.4.1 Are minority and other interests less than control caught by the merger control rules?
Acquisitions of minority or other interests that do not lead to an acquisition of control do not fall within the Swiss merger control rules and will not be considered by the Competition Commission.

Nevertheless, according to the Competition Commission, control can be acquired even without acquisition of shares if contractual agreements or factual circumstances lead to de facto control, e.g. based on a loan agreement together with additional contractual rights (such as distribution agreements, information rights etc.). The acquisition of a minority interest must also be notified if it allows the undertaking to exercise control over another undertaking.

2. Establishing jurisdiction for notification of mergers

2.1 Merging parties/undertakings concerned

2.1.1 Which undertakings are considered parties to the merger ("undertakings concerned") in the various types of transactions identified under Section 1.1.1 and 1.2.1?

In a merger, the "undertakings concerned" are each of the merging entities.

In an acquisition of control, the undertakings concerned may vary depending on the characteristics of the transaction.

In case of acquisition of sole control, the undertakings concerned are the acquiring undertaking consisting of all entities belonging to the same group (i.e. parent, subsidiaries, sister companies etc.) and the target undertaking (i.e. not including the seller).

In case of acquisition of joint control of a newly created joint venture, the undertakings concerned are each of the undertakings jointly acquiring control.

If one undertaking contributes a pre-existing subsidiary or a business (over which it exercises sole control) to a newly created joint venture, the undertakings concerned are the undertakings jointly acquiring control and the pre-existing subsidiary (please note that the practice of the Competition Commission is not coherent in this respect and in some cases has also not considered the pre-existing subsidiary as a separate undertaking concerned).

In case of acquisition of joint control over a pre-existing undertaking or business, the undertakings concerned are each of the undertakings acquiring joint control, and the pre-existing acquired undertaking.

In case of entry of a new shareholder in a pre-existing joint venture, which leads to a change in the quality of control for the remaining controlling shareholders, the undertakings concerned are the newly entering controlling shareholder alongside with the remaining controlling shareholders, and the pre-existing joint venture.

In case where a pre-existing, full-function joint venture acquires control over another undertaking, the undertakings concerned are the joint venture (i.e. not including the parent companies) and the target undertaking. Where a joint venture is mere acquisition vehicle, the undertakings concerned are in such situation the parent companies to the joint venture and the target undertaking.

In case of change from joint control to sole control, the undertakings concerned are the undertaking acquiring the sole control and the joint venture. The other "existing" shareholder (i.e. the seller) is not considered an undertaking concerned.

2.2 Date for establishing jurisdiction

2.2.1 Which date is relevant for concluding whether the transaction is notifiable?

Whichever date is earlier of the date of conclusion of the binding legal agreement, the announcement of a public bid, the acquisition of a controlling interest or the date of the notification to the Secretariat of the Competition Commission.

2.3 General thresholds

2.3.1 Threshold(s) for when a concentration must be notified under the general merger control regime?

If either of the two alternative thresholds is met, the transaction will have to be notified to the Swiss Competition authority:

The first alternative threshold:

a) the undertakings concerned had, in the last financial year prior to the transaction, an aggregate worldwide turnover of at least CHF 2 billion or an aggregate turnover in Switzerland of at least CHF 500 million; and

b) at least two of the undertakings concerned had, in the last financial year prior to the transaction, an individual turnover in Switzerland of at least CHF 100 million.

The second alternative threshold:

Furthermore, a transaction must be notified if the Swiss Competition Commission has previously established in a binding and final decision under the Swiss Federal Act on Cartels and other Restraints of Competition that one of the undertakings concerned has a dominant position in a market in Switzerland and the transaction concerns this market, an adjacent market or a market either upstream or downstream.

2.3.2 For each threshold, can the threshold be triggered by only one party having local turnover?

The first alternative thresholds cannot be triggered by only one party to the transaction.

The second alternative threshold can be triggered by only one party to the transaction.

2.3.3 For each threshold, can the threshold be triggered without any party having local turnover?

The thresholds cannot be triggered without any party having turnover in Switzerland.

2.3.4 Are there any circumstances where transactions falling below these thresholds may be still investigated?

Transactions falling below the thresholds may not be investigated by the Swiss Competition authority within a merger control procedure.

2.4 Other national thresholds for ex ante merger control (e.g. sector-specific rules)

2.4.1 Relevant thresholds for sector-specific or other ex ante merger control rules?

There are not sector-specific or other ex ante merger control rules in Switzerland.

2.4.2 Are any such schemes mandatory or voluntary?

Not applicable.

2.5 Foreign-to-foreign mergers

2.5.1 Do any exemptions, special thresholds etc. apply to foreign-to-foreign mergers, i.e. where none of the undertakings concerned is domiciled in the jurisdiction?

In general, transactions reaching the thresholds must be notified. In Switzerland there is a local effects exemption in one limited situation. The exemption is applicable in the case of (1) the acquisition or creation of a joint venture company that (2) has neither any turnover in Switzerland, (3) nor any current or future business activities in Switzerland.

The Swiss Competition authority considers that such transactions do not have any effect in Switzerland, even if the controlling undertakings fulfil the turnover thresholds. Therefore, such transactions do not need to be notified in Switzerland.

3. Calculation and allocation of turnover, asset value, transaction value etc.

3.1 Relevant turnover

3.1.1 How is turnover defined (e.g. is income from other sources than "ordinary activities to be included, and how are rebates, taxes, internal turnover etc. treated)?

The relevant turnover to be taken into account is the net turnover related to the sale of products and/or provision of services within the ordinary course of business exclusive of (i) discounts and/or rebates; (ii) value added tax and other consumption taxes as well as other taxes directly related to turnover; and (iii) group internal sales.

3.1.2 Identification and link to any official rules, guidance etc. on how to calculate turnover?

For calculation of turnover art. 4 and art. 5 of the Merger Control Ordinance are relevant.

Guidance to the calculation of turnover can be found in the Competition Commission's Merger Notification Procedures Template and Merger Notification Explanatory Notes. The Merger Notification Procedures Template is available in German, French, Italian and English and the Merger Notification Notes in German, French and Italian on:

https://www.weko.admin.ch/weko/en/home/services/notifications.html

3.2 Relevant period for calculation of turnover

3.2.1 Which financial year(s) is relevant for the calculation of turnover?

The turnover should be based on the latest financial year for which annual accounts exist. In contrast to the European Commission the Swiss Competition authority also uses unaudited figures from the most recent financial year if necessary. 

3.2.2 Should adjustments be made for e.g. divestitures, acquisitions, closings and other changes of the economic reality of the undertaking concerned made after or during the relevant financial year?

Adjustments must be made for any divestitures/acquisitions made during/after the latest financial year. Turnover stemming from such divested/acquired assets should be excluded/included.

3.3 Relevant undertakings for the calculation of turnover

3.3.1 The "undertakings concerned", i.e. which parties?

See Section 2.1.1 above.

3.3.2 The undertakings whose turnover is taken into account?

See the definition of the "undertakings concerned" in Section 2.1.1 above. In short, the undertakings whose turnover is taken into account comprise the entire group that the acquirer belongs to and the target's group (i.e. target and any of its wholly or jointly-owned subsidiaries).

3.3.3 Shall the turnover of the existing seller be included in the target's group turnover?

The seller's turnover shall not be included in the target's group turnover.

3.4 Geographical allocation of turnover

3.4.1 The principles for the geographical allocation of turnover?

The geographic allocation of turnover is based on the customer's location, i.e. the place where the characteristic action under the contract is to be performed. Different rules may apply to services.

3.5 Valuation and allocation of assets

3.5.1 The principles for valuation and allocation of assets?

Not applicable.

3.6 Calculation of other thresholds

3.6.1 The principles for calculation of metrics for other thresholds (e.g. transaction value, market share, share of supply etc.)?

Not applicable.

3.7 Special rules

3.7.1 Do any special rules or principles apply to the calculation, allocation etc. of turnover, assets etc. for specific undertakings (e.g. State-owned undertakings, investment funds, credit and financial institutions, insurance companies, financial holding companies, others)?

Banking and Insurance

Specific rules apply to the calculation of turnover for banking and insurance companies.

In the case of insurance companies, "turnover" is replaced by "annual gross insurance premium income", and in the case of banks and other financial intermediaries that are subject to the Banking Act of 8 November 1934 on accounting regulations “turnover” is replaced by "gross income".

3.7.2 Does any exemptions apply?

Not applicable.

1. Practical information

1.1 Responsibility for filing

1.1.1 The parties responsible for filing?

In case of a merger, the notification must be jointly submitted by the merging parties.

In case of acquisition of sole control, the acquirer is responsible for filing.

In case of acquisition of joint control, the notification must be submitted by the parties acquiring control.

1.2 Deadlines for filing

1.2.1 Are there any mandatory deadlines for filing, and, if so, how these are calculated?

There is no deadline for the notification, but the transaction may not be closed prior to clearance by the Competition Commission. 

1.2.2 Are there any sanctions for not filing within the deadlines?

As stated in Section 1.2.1 above there is no deadline for filing. However, if a notifiable merger is not filed, the enterprise that was required to file may face a fine up to CHF 1 million.

Furthermore, a natural person who implements a concentration that should have been notified without filing a notification, or who violates rulings relating to concentrations of undertakings is liable to a fine not exceeding CHF 20,000.

1.3 Early filing

1.3.1 Is it possible to file before the signing of merger agreement?

A requirement to notification is generally the conclusion of the purchase agreement. If the purchase agreement is not yet concluded and the merger merely intended, a notification is possible if the notifying parties can credibly demonstrate that the undertakings taking part in the merger are willing to conclude the purchase agreement.

In the case of a public takeover offer, the notification must be submitted immediately after the publication of the takeover offer, but in any case, before execution.

1.4 Filing fees

1.4.1 Are there any fees for filing, and, if so, please describe how such fees are calculated?

There are no filing fees as such. However, the Competition Commission will charge a lump-sum fee of CHF 5,000 for its Phase I investigation. For the Phase II investigation, the fee is based on hourly charges of CHF 100–400.

1.4.2 When must the filing fee must be paid?

In general, the fees have to be paid within 30 days after receiving the invoice. The invoice is normally sent within days after the Competition authority issues its decision. There is no established practice regarding exceptions from paying the fee.

1.5 Publicity

1.5.1 When and in which format will the authority publish receiving a notification?

The Competition Commission does not publish the receipt of a notification. The Secretariat of the Competition Commission will only provide the notifying enterprises with a written confirmation of the receipt of the notification and its completeness within 10 calendar days since receipt of the notification.

1.5.2 How will the authority in general handle the case publicly, e.g. will it usually comment in the media, send out press releases etc.?

The Competition Commission publishes neither the notification nor the fact that a notification has been made. However, the Competition Commission publishes its decision to open a Phase II investigation. Moreover, the final decisions (clearance, clearance subject to conditions or obligations, prohibition) are published.

In transactions of public interest, the Competition Commission may issue a press release or hold a press conference in order to inform on the opening of a Phase II investigation or to explain its decision.

1.5.3 Will third parties be able to review the notification?

In the Phase I investigation, third parties have no right to access the file.

If an in-depth investigation is initiated (Phase II), third parties can request access to the files (including the parties' submissions) based on the Federal Act on Freedom of Information in the Administration. However, access to documents based on the Freedom of Information Act is granted only after an investigation has been closed by the Competition Commission. Additionally, limitations apply to confidential information, such as business secrets and personal data. To date, the Competition Commission discloses information to third parties only in a relatively limited manner, as there is little practice concerning the relation between privacy and freedom of information in Switzerland.

2. Procedure and timing

2.1 Normal and simplified procedures

2.1.1. Does the regime allow for a simplified (fast track) procedure, and, if so, what are the criteria for using the simplified procedure?

There is no short form or simplified procedure for certain types of mergers. However, the undertakings concerned may, at any time prior to the notification of the transaction, discuss with the Secretariat of the Competition Commission the scope of the information that must be provided. In particular, the Secretariat of the Competition Commission may exempt the parties from providing certain information that is not required for its assessment of the concentration.

Simplified notifications can, in particular, be used in foreign-to-foreign transactions, and in transactions that are notified in parallel to the EU Commission (i.e. in cases in which a transaction triggers both the separate EU and Swiss merger control notification thresholds). In these cases, the form CO can be submitted as an attachment to the Swiss notification form.

The Secretariat of the Competition Commission has indicated in an explanatory notice that certain detailed information about markets, in which only one undertaking has a market share on its own of more than 30% in Switzerland, must not be provided, unless another undertaking concerned (i) is active on a closely linked market that is upstream, downstream, or neighboring, (ii) is planning a market entry into the affected market or has been pursuing such plans for the last two years, (iii) has intellectual property rights on this affected market, or (iv) is active on the same product market but not on the same geographic market.

2.2 Procedural stages (cf. timetable below)

2.2.1 The various stages of (i) a simplified procedure and (ii) a normal procedure?

Generally, merger procedures are initiated by a pre-notification period. In this period the Secretariat of the Competition Commission is willing to indicate whether a draft notification would be considered complete and gives information about the scope of information to be provided.

After the optional pre-notification period the one-month period (Phase I) for examination procedure commences on the day following receipt of the complete notification and expires the following month at the end of the same numerical day as the day upon which the period commences.

During the Phase I period, the case team may also send requests for information to the parties, market test questionnaires to the largest customers, competitors and suppliers of the notifying parties.

The Competition Commission can issue either a clearance notice or information about the initiation of an in-depth investigation within the deadline for the Phase I procedure. If no such notice is given within the time period, the transaction will be deemed cleared and may be implemented without reservation.

If the Competition Commission permits implementation, it may make implementation subject to certain conditions and obligations. In cases where permission to implement is granted in connection with a public offer, it may order that the voting rights acquired by the offeror be used solely for the preservation of the value of its investment. 

If there are indications that the concentration may create or strengthen a dominant position, an in-depth investigation is opened. The Secretariat of the Competition Commission then publishes the principal terms of the notification of the concentration and states the time frame within which third parties may comment on the notified concentration.

Usually, in a Phase II investigation, hearings take place and the parties may file further documents and information. Also, the Secretariat of the Competition Commission sends out additional questionnaires to customers, suppliers and competitors in order to deepen the market research and analysis.

The transaction cannot be closed prior to the Competition Commission rendering its final decision (within 4 months) unless it has given special authorization.

Phase II may be terminated as follows: (i) unconditional authorization; (ii) authorization subject to conditions and obligations (remedies); (iii) prohibition and (iv) withdrawal of notification.

2.2.2 Is pre-notification contact with the relevant authorities customary/obligatory/encouraged/etc.?

Pre-notification contact is not foreseen in the Swiss Federal Act on Cartels and other Restraints of Competition. However, approaching the Secretariat of the Competition Commission prior to a notification in order to discuss the scope of information to be provided is a common and recommended practice. Generally, the Secretariat of the Competition Commission is willing to indicate whether a draft notification would be considered complete during the pre-notification procedure.

2.2.3 Are there any sanctions for not filing within the deadlines?

Not applicable.

2.3 Timetable (cf. timetable below)

2.3.1 The statutory timetable/deadlines for review of a notification?

Phase I:

Phase I starts on the day following the receipt of the complete notification by the Competition authority. The Secretariat of the Competition Commission has 10 calendar days to confirm the receipt and completion of the notification.

If the Secretariat of the Competition Commission considers the notification to be incomplete, it will request the necessary information, and the one-month period will only start upon receipt of the completed notification.

Even after confirmation of the completion of the notification, the Secretariat of the Competition Commission may request additional information from the undertakings concerned, associated undertakings, the sellers and affected third parties. Such requests do not stop the clock.

The Competition authority can issue either a clearance notice or information about the initiation of an in-depth investigation within the deadline for the Phase I procedure. If no such notice is given within the time period, the transaction will be deemed cleared and may be implemented without reservation.

Phase II:

The Competition Commission has four months in order to complete the in-depth investigation.

2.3.2 Can the statutory timetable/deadlines be suspended ("stop-the-clock"), and if so under which conditions?

The timeframe of Phase II may only be suspended by the Competition authority if the assessment is hindered due to circumstances for which the undertakings concerned are responsible. Otherwise, the Competition Commission may not decide on its own on an extension. Furthermore, the timeframe may be amended if there are any material changes in the actual circumstances that have been described in the notification. If such changes are significant for the assessment, the Secretariat of the Competition Commission or the Competition Commission may decide in Phase I or Phase II that the timeframes shall only start after the information on the material changes has been received.

2.3.3 If pre-notification with the relevant authorities contact is possible/customary, how long will the duration of such contact usually be?

There is no statutory timetable/deadline for the pre-notification period and the duration of such period may vary from a couple of weeks to more than a month, depending on namely the complexity of the specific transaction at hand.

3. Format and content of notification

3.1 Notification forms

3.1.1 Must the notifying parties use any mandatory notification forms, e.g. for simplified and normal procedures, and, if relevant, add a link to the relevant forms?

The information necessary for a notification is described in art. 11 of the Merger Control Ordinance. Additionally, based on art. 13 of the Merger Control Ordinance, the Competition Commission has issued a standard notification form together with explanatory notes. This form was updated on 31 August 2015 and can be downloaded in the official Swiss languages of German, French and Italian at: https://www.weko.admin.ch/weko/de/home/dienstleistungen/meldeformulare.html

Foreign notification forms, such as the European Form CO, may also be submitted if the Swiss notification provides for the additional necessary information.

3.2 Supporting documentation

3.2.1 List of the supporting documentation which must as a minimum be submitted along with the notification?

Cf. checklist below.

3.3 Originals, legalization and apostillation (cf. checklist below)

3.3.1 List of all documents which must be submitted in original/legalized versions and whether any documents must be apostilled?

Not applicable.

3.3.2 If the merger regime has a mandatory filing deadline, must all the documents identified under Section 3.3.1 be submitted within this deadline?

Not applicable.

3.4 Language

3.4.1 Which languages may be used for drafting and filing a notification?

A filing can be made in any one of the official languages of Switzerland (French, German or Italian). Accompanying documents may also be submitted in English.

3.4.2 Does translations have to be certified/legalized and apostilled?

There are no specific requirements for the certification of the translation.

Statutory timetable

Step Description Time
1

Pre-notification

Pre-notification contact is not foreseen in the Swiss Federal Act on Cartels and other Restraints of Competition. However, approaching the Secretariat of the Competition Commission prior to a notification in order to discuss the scope of information to be provided is a common and recommended practice. Generally, the Secretariat of the Competition Commission is willing to indicate whether a draft notification would be considered complete during the pre-notification procedure.

There is no statutory timetable/deadline for the pre-notification period and the duration of such period may vary from a couple of weeks to more than a month, depending on namely the complexity of the specific transaction at hand.

2

Phase I

After the optional pre-notification period the one-month period (Phase I) for examination procedure commences on the day following receipt of the complete notification and expires the following month at the end of the same numerical day as the day upon which the period commences.

During the Phase I period, the case team may also send requests for information to the parties, market test questionnaires to the largest customers, competitors and suppliers of the notifying parties.

The Competition Commission can issue either a clearance notice or information about the initiation of an in-depth investigation within the deadline for the Phase I procedure. If no such notice is given within the time period, the transaction will be deemed cleared and may be implemented without reservation.

If the Competition Commission permits implementation, it may make implementation subject to certain conditions and obligations. In cases where permission to implement is granted in connection with a public offer, it may order that the voting rights acquired by the offeror be used solely for the preservation of the value of its investment.

Phase I starts on the day following the receipt of the complete notification by the Competition authority.

The Secretariat of the Competition Commission has 10 calendar days to confirm the receipt and completion of the notification.

If the Secretariat of the Competition Commission considers the notification to be incomplete, it will request the necessary information, and the one-month period will only start upon receipt of the completed notification.

Even after confirmation of the completion of the notification, the Secretariat of the Competition Commission may request additional information from the undertakings concerned, associated undertakings, the sellers and affected third parties. Such requests do not stop the clock.

However, please be aware that "stop-the-clock" is possible under other circumstances (cf. 2.3.2 above).

3

Phase II

If there are indications that the concentration may create or strengthen a dominant position, an in-depth investigation is opened. The Secretariat of the Competition Commission then publishes the principal terms of the notification of the concentration and states the time frame within which third parties may comment on the notified concentration.

Usually, in a Phase II investigation, hearings take place and the parties may file further documents and information. Also, the Secretariat of the Competition Commission sends out additional questionnaires to customers, suppliers and competitors in order to deepen the market research and analysis.

The transaction cannot be closed prior to the Competition Commission rendering its final decision (within 4 months) unless it has given special authorization.

Phase II may be terminated as follows: (i) unconditional authorization; (ii) authorization subject to conditions and obligations (remedies); (iii) prohibition and (iv) withdrawal of notification.

The Competition Commission has four months in order to complete the in-depth investigation.

Please be aware that "stop-the-clock" is possible (cf. 2.3.2 above).

  • Step 1 1
  • Step 2 2
  • Step 3 3
  • Not defined
  • 1 month
  • 4 months

Checklist

List of the supporting documentation which must as a minimum be submitted along with the notification.

Supporting documentation

This content was delivered
and last updated on 29-08-2019 by
Contact Person
David Mamane, Partner
CONTACT DETAILS:

Schellenberg Wittmer has provided all input about merger control in Switzerland.

Schellenberg Wittmer’s Competition Group comprises leading experts specializing in advising and representing clients in matters pertaining to competition law or having a regulatory impact. We advise on competition law issues concerning commercial practices and agreements as well as on the preparation of filings for merger control. We further develop strategies in view of civil law litigations, compliance programs, internal investigations and audits.

The team represents clients in particular in Merger control; Competition law investigations by the Swiss competition authority, with special expertise in representing parties in dominance and distribution cases; General competition advice regarding exclusive and selective distribution agreements and licensing agreements; National and international leniency procedures; Dawn raids by the Swiss Competition Authority; Internal investigations; Compliance programs, training-e-learning and audits; Arbitration and litigation matters with competition law aspects; and Telecom and energy regulatory assignments, health care procedures, public procurement and investigations by the Swiss Price Supervisor.

Schellenberg Wittmer's Competition and Antitrust team is highly ranked and recognized in Chambers Europe, Legal 500, Who's Who Legal: Switzerland Guide, International Competition Guide and Competition Thought Leaders Guide, Global Competition Review (GCR) Top 100 Firms and Expert Guides.  

For more information about Schellenberg Wittmer and merger control in Switzerland please contact our Partner directly.

Banner Logo     Banner Logo    Banner Logo    Banner Logo